Ultimate Tasmania Itinerary: 10 Days In Tasmania

Ultimate Tasmania Itinerary: 10 Days In Tasmania

Tasmania used to be the butt of many Aussie jokes. But it’s not quite like that anymore. As people everywhere are learning about the magnificence of this island state, it is blossoming into a tourism, foodie and outdoor adventure mecca. With remote wilderness landscapes, expansive surf beaches, an emerging café scene, and regular music and arts festivals, now is the time to visit Australia’s island state (before the secret’s well and truly out).

 

I often hear people saying “I have always wanted to go to Tasmania, but never had the chance”, or “one day I’ll go to Tasmania”. It might be the southern-most point in Australia and the edge of the world, but with incredibly cheap and quick flights from the mainland there is no excuse any more. Only 1 hour and $50-$100 by plane from Melbourne and you are transported to another world. A world of tranquility, the freshest air, and the most exciting adventures.

 

You can be forgiven for wondering “what would a Tasmania itinerary actually look like?” Well, here is one prepared earlier. Jam packed full of the best this beautiful state has to offer.

 


READ MORE: 40 BEST Ways To Spend Your Summer In Tassie


Tasmania Itinerary

A subterranean walkway at MONA (photo from Sahra via Flickr)

Day 1 

So you’ve arrived in Hobart. Welcome to Tasmania’s exquisite capital city — the perfect place to

 

After sorting out a rental car (trust me, in Tassie you’ll need one) and checking into your accommodation it’s time to hit MONA. MONA is the Museum of Old and New Art and it has been getting some serious attention recently. This museum is guaranteed to make an impression with the attention-grabbing art. You can even see an artificial poo machine… now that’s something you don’t see that every day.

 

A walk around Sullivan’s Cove and the wharf is a great way to spend a pleasant evening in Hobart. This area extends into Salamanca so there are plenty of restaurants and bars to keep you occupied. Make sure to try some of Tasmania’s well-renowned whiskey, wine, and seafood if you can.

 


 tasmania itinerary


Saturday markets at Salamanca (photo from Robyn Jay via Flickr)


Day 2

Head down to the beautiful sandstone-clad Salamanca Place in the morning. Locals know that Salamanca is the place for brunch. The pick of the bunch would be the Machine Laundry Café or Smolt in Salamanca Square, or head up to nearby Battery Point to eat at Jackman and McRoss or Pollen Tea Room.

 

If you’re in Hobart on Saturday then you should make sure you wander around Salamanca Market. This market is Australia’s largest open air market and is full of fantastic stalls. Salamanca Market has oodles of fresh Tasmanian food, local musical talent, and trinkets. The atmosphere is unforgettable!

 

It runs from 8:30am – 3:00pm on Saturdays

 

In the afternoon, pay Mt Wellington a visit for the (uncontested) best view of Hobart. It’s a comfortable 20min drive from the CBD and the road takes you to the summit. All along the mountain there are plenty of places to stop and admire including Secret Falls at the Foothills, having a bite to eat at the Fern Tree Tavern, or walking the Pipeline Track. A full list of walks around the mountain area can be found at Greater Hobart Trails. I would recommend a stop at the Organ Pipes walking track on the drive down. It only takes 20mins walking until you’re right up close and personal with the imposing rock spires.

 

If you’re heading up in winter there is regularly snow and the road might be closed (plus it’s freezing cold eek!), so be prepared!

 

tasmania itinerary

The view of Hobart from Mount Wellington (photo from Adam Selwood via Flickr)

For the best evening vibes head to the suburb of North Hobart. North Hobart boasts a restaurant strip that puts all others to shame and it continues to get better and better. Along the North Hobart strip you can indulge in a drink or two at Room For a Pony, grab some mouth-watering food at Pancho Villa or Capital, or see some live music at the Republic Bar.

 


Day 3

 

It’s time to say goodbye to beautiful Hobart and start exploring further from the capital. Where’s the best place to venture to first? Well it’s gotta be the Tasman Peninsula. This is the epicentre of rugged landscapes and Tassie history. Drive on down to Eaglehawk Neck which will take about an hour and a half. At Eaglehawk Neck you will find extensive views out to Tasman Cape.

 

In the Eaglehawk Neck area there is plenty to see. If you’re on Instagram you have most likely already gawked at the geometric patterns of the Tessellated Pavement — now it’s time to see them in real life. Also it is worth seeing Tasman Arch and the Blow Hole. These are all only a couple of minutes away.

 

tasmania itinerary

The Port Arthur Penitentiary (photo from Andrew Braithwaite via Flickr)

 

Next, head to the former convict settlement of Port Arthur. Here you can uncover Tasmania’s fascinating convict past. Many of the sites are well-preserved plus there are plenty of picnic spots to enjoy a packed lunch. If you’re feeling a bit spooky then there are ghost tours at night around many of the old prison buildings. This tour gets the nerves going and also provides some more intriguing insight.

 

You can buy tickets for the Port Arthur Historic Site here

 

Once you’ve had your dose of convict history, drive down to the start of the Cape Hauy walking track. There is a well maintained camping area at Fortescue Bay located amongst picturesque bushland and beaches. This is a spectacular place to camp (assuming the weather is good) and it at the starting point for one of Tasmania’s greatest short walks.

 


READ MORE: Tasmania’s Best Short Walks



Day 4 

 

Today is going to be a big day so start early. It’s time to pack up the campsite, put on those hiking boots and start this epic day walk. The Cape Hauy walk is a relatively leisurely 3.5/4 hours return. This hike will show you dramatic and jaw-dropping sea cliff views. Since the Three Capes Track was developed the infrastructure here has improved a lot so the tracks are a lot easier now. Keep your eye on the ocean too because pods of seals and dolphins are commonplace around here!

 

The Cape Hauy walk is the easiest (and quickest) of the cape walks but provides equally spectacular views. If you are looking for something more challenging then Cape Raoul or Cape Pillar might be for you.

 

In the afternoon, settle back into the car and head up to Tasmania’s East Coast. It’s now aptly named the “Great Eastern Drive” and you will soon see why. The coastal scenery is spectacular! Aim for Coles Bay which has a huge range of camping and other accommodation options. This is about a 3 hour drive from Cape Hauy so plan accordingly.

 

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Day 5 

 

Now you’re in Coles Bay you can access the many amazing day hikes nearby. People come here is primarily to see Wineglass Bay so you should, too. There are several walks which get you to Wineglass Bay or to some amazing views. There is the traditional saddle walk over the Hazards Mountains with a half-way lookout point, or you can climb up Mount Amos for a view with some serious height advantage.

If you just feel like quickly seeing Wineglass Bay and then heading back and relaxing then I would recommend doing the lookout walk (1hr return) and then coming back to Honeymoon Bay. Honeymoon Bay is within the borders of Freycinet National Park and is a secluded, peaceful beach. It is the perfect place to kick back and read a book. Sunsets and sunrises anywhere around Freycinet National Park are bold and worth watching.

Coles Bay is a great base for kayaking and fishing if you want a break from hikes. For surfers, Friendly Beaches is only a short drive away and gets great waves.

 

tasmania itinerary

The view of Wineglass Bay from the lookout 


Day 6 

 

Continue making your way up the coast. When going through Bicheno don’t forget to stop for a pie at Blue Edge Bakery – they’re pretty famous in Tassie! Bicheno itself is a pleasant seaside town with a beautiful beach. It is worthwhile taking a break from driving and hanging out here for a while.

 

If you are looking for a break from the coast, taking a side trip to Douglas Apsley National Park is a good option. This National Park is packed full of waterfalls and has a famous watering hole. The watering hole is the perfect place for a refreshing dip.

 

The stretch of coastline that steals my heart is the Bay of Fires, just north of the Binalong Bay along the upper sections of the Great Eastern Drive. It is easy to spend hours strolling along the vast empty beaches admiring the striking coastline. Much of the coastline is an orange colour due to the lichen and it gives a spectacular effect.

 

Tasmania Itinerary

 

 


Day 7 

 

Today aim for Tasmania’s second biggest city: Launceston. Along the way there is an excellent dairy at Pyengana that produces delicious award-winning cheeses and ice cream. All these joys can be found at their Holy Cow Café.

 

Only a few minutes’ drive from the dairy is St Columba Falls, one of the highest water cascades in Tasmania. The waterfall is only a short walk to reach from the carpark. The rolling farming hills around Scottsdale are very picturesque to drive past as you continue on to Launceston.

 

When arriving in Launceston head to the Queen Victoria Museum. This place has some great exhibits on Launceston’s railway heritage, blacksmith factories and Tasmanian fauna. For lunch, the café on site has affordable food and seating inside an old railway carriage. If museums are not your thing, driving along the Tamar Valley just north of Launceston is another option. This region is full of rich farmland with many wineries, berry farms and lavender fields. Many businesses sell products right from the farm or cellar door, so stop off at any that take your fancy.

 

Tasmania Itinerary

Green surrounds of the Tamar Valley (by dal48 via Flickr) 

 

In the evening grab some BBQ items from a supermarket (along with anything you picked up in the Tamar Valley) and head to the Cataract Gorge. This canyon is only a few minutes drive out of the town centre and is a pleasant picnic spot with free BBQs on site. It’s one of Launceston’s icons and a great place to spend an evening. You can go swimming in the pool or Gorge itself for free, so pack the swimmers and go for a refreshing dip.

 

 

 

Tasmania Itinerary

The Cataract Gorge – a great picnic or BBQ spot (photo by Atsushi Kase via Flickr)


Day 8

 

Time to head to one of Tasmania’s most famous locations: Cradle Mountain. Pay Liffey Falls a visit along the way for a gorgeous pitstop. It’s a peaceful waterfall nestled amongst lush Tasmanian rainforest and worth some time.

 

There are many styles of accommodation within the Cradle Mountain National Park. You can choose between camping, cabins or lodges. There are many stunning walks for all abilities and capturing the beauty of Cradle Mountain is possible with most of them. Easier walks such as the Dove Lake Circuit are accessible and stunning. If you’re game then you can try the Cradle Mountain summit which gets pretty steep towards the end but is comfortably a day walk. Visit the Information Centre on site for a comprehensive list of walks and check the weather before leaving, conditions can change quickly!

 

 

Tasmania Itinerary

Many tourists miss Liffey Falls — don’t make that mistake! (Photo by Scott Cresswell via Flickr) 

 

Tasmania Itinerary

A spectacular view of Cradle Mountain and Dove Lake (photo by Chris Baxter via Flickr)


Day 9 

When you feel satisfied with what you’ve seen at Cradle Mountain you can pack up camp and make your way along the Northwest Coast. There are many great locations to stop and take in the views, such as Table Cape which is a lighthouse-topped landmass with tulip fields bursting into colour during spring.

 

Boat Harbour is another spot worth checking out. This place is a small seaside town with a calm sheltered beach perfect to have a picnic on. Stanley is a unique location to visit made famous by ‘The Nut’, a large rock landmass towering above the fishing village below. Climbing The Nut is a bit of a Stanley rite of passage.

 

 

Tasmania Itinerary

 

Stanley and ‘The Nut’ (photo from Eli Duke via Flickr)


Day 10

 

On Day 10 you will probably have make your way back to wherever you’re leaving from and this can be done in several ways.

 

LAUNCESTON

Leaving from Launceston would give you more time to relax and is the best option. Driving to Launceston from Stanley would take about 2:30hrs and can be done via Burnie and Devonport.

HOBART

If you’re leaving from Hobart you can drive down directly through the Midlands Highway which would take around 4:45hrs but isn’t the most scenic route. Alternatively you can take the longer (around 6:00hrs) and winder option which goes down the western side of Tassie. Here you can pass through rugged Tasmanian destinations such as Queenstown and Derwent Bridge (and possibly pop into Strahan).

 


Having grown up in Tasmania it is a place that I will always recommend to family and friends. Tasmania is truly unique and will take your breath away. The Apple Isle is packed full of adventure and 10 days will give you a good sample. With a growing tourism industry, the time to visit Tasmania is now. The infrastructure is in place and the numbers are starting to creep up so get in while you can. If you enjoy good food, an emerging art scene, and rugged natural beauty, then this is the place for you. There is so much more than what is mentioned in this Tasmania Itinerary but it is a good start.

 

If you’ve been to Tasmania or want to know more, please comment below! 

 


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Dark Mofo: Why It Is The Hottest Thing To Do This Winter

Dark Mofo: Why It Is The Hottest Thing To Do This Winter

Dark Mofo is about to descend on the southern-most capital of Australia. Hobart’s brooding, hedonistic and ever-expanding winter festival draws crowds from interstate and abroad. Celebrating all things winter and weird, Dark Mofo is quickly becoming one of Australia’s most looked-forward-to events.

 

Winter in Tasmania is nationally renowned for being cold and dark. This used to sound like a negative. That was until the masterminds behind MONA decided to create a festival celebrating the edgier and darker side of the season. This creation gave us Hobartians something to look forward to in winter, and develops a unique gothic cross paganistic atmosphere inspiring everyone to come out and play. Think dark art installations, winter feasts, fire pits, and an array of unusual musical wonder.

 

This year the fifth annual festival runs from Thursday 8 June to Wednesday 21 June and the lineup is packed. You should not miss out this year (I’m definitely flying home for it!). Tickets for events can be purchased on the Dark Mofo website.

 


READ MORE: Ultimate 10 Day Tasmanian Itinerary


 

Winter Feast


Dark Mofo

 

The winter feast is easily the pièce de résistance for the Dark Mofo festival, being the heart (and the stomach) of everything that happens here. Filling up Hobart’s Princes Wharf, the feast is full of brooding lights, music, fire pits, and the freshest Tasmanian produce. The decoration of the wharf is always impeccable and creates the perfect atmosphere to warm up from the bitter cold outside. Door sales are $10 or there is free entry after 8PM.

 

Nude Solstice Swim


Dark Mofo

 

This may sound weird but bear with me (or bare with me). The Nude Solstice Swim caps off the Dark Mofo celebrations as some of the bravest souls of Hobart bare all and take a dip in the freezing Derwent River to mark the longest night of the year. The communal ritual feels rather cathartic and everyone is too worried about the cold to worry about how they look. And don’t worry — there are dressing gowns and fire pits for when you re-emerge!

 

Transliminal


Running on the chilling nights of both the weekends of Dark Mofo, Transliminal promises to deliver electronic beats that will warm the soul. Transliminal will take over the Hobart City Hall and transform it into an immersive house and techno experience. This hedonistic immersion will provide a night to remember (and it’s expected to be a late one). Door sales are $50 or $20 after 2AM.

 

Dark Park


Dark Mofo

Dark Mofo

 

Dark Park is the centrepiece of Dark Mofo’s public art spaces, based in a large industrial space near the wharf. It is only a short distance from the feast so is the perfect place to go after you’ve eaten up. This is an immersive art experience on a large scale. The main drawcard this year is the immersive sound and light installation iy_project 136.1 Hz by Chris Levine and Marco Perry.

 

Each year at Dark Park there is the Ogoh-ogoh which is purged and burned. This year the sculpture is a wooden wolf. You write your fears onto a piece of paper and put them into the ogoh-ogoh, and then on the final Sunday of the festival (June 18), the ogoh-ogoh is burned and all the fears go up in smoke. It really is incredible to take part in.

 

All activities and art at the Dark Park are free of charge.

 

Pussy Riot


Dark Mofo

 

You probably remember the feminist punk group Pussy Riot and now you have the chance to hear the DJ set. The revolutionary Russian activists are putting on a DJ set for Dark Mofo followed by a Q&A session where audience members can ask questions. This is sure to be thoroughly interesting and something not to be missed.

 

Dark Mofo Films


Dark Mofo films is collated this year by Nick Batzias and James Hewison. Although the program has not been released yet, it is always full of cinematic wonder (both old and new). Films, live performances, and documentaries are all on the agenda. Dark Mofo Films takes place from Friday 2 June to Sunday 18 June over the State Cinema and Cinemona.

 


SUMMER MORE YOUR THING? 40 BEST Ways To Spend Your Summer In Tasmania


Dark Mofo

Dark Mofo

 

So get yourself down Tasmania this winter and embrace the rituals of Dark Mofo. Warm yourself from the bitter midwinter cold with delicious food, immersive light shows, and an impressive musical line up.

 

If you can’t make it then make sure to tune into Travel Textbook on Instagram and Twitter for live coverage of the events.

 


Been to Dark Mofo or have questions? Leave a comment below 

 


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Images supplied by Dark Mofo and Moorilla 

Jetstar Birthday Sale: Get In Quick and Return For FREE!

Jetstar Birthday Sale: Get In Quick and Return For FREE!

Each year the Australian budget carrier Jetstar celebrates its birthday with a monumental sale. This year is no different with the epic return free sale. Last year I posted about this sale and heard that it helped a lot of you get cheap flights, so here it is again. The sale ends on the 24th of May AEST.

 

Not only are there discounted fares but you get your return flight FREE. These are incredible savings for budget travellers that you don’t see any other time of the year.

 

Book here 

 

This sale works for many domestic and international flights. University students and families will be pleased to know that the flights cover both the mid year break and the summer holidays. So whether you want to go from Sydney to Ho Chi Minh return for $199, or Melbourne to Honolulu for $339 return — the world is your oyster.

 


READ MORE: Hawaii Photo Diary


 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 


READ MORE: Bali For Beginners – The First Timer’s Guide


 


Please note that I am in no way affiliated with Jetstar, just love a good travel deal. 


 

Hawaii Photo Diary: Exploring Paradise With A Camera

Hawaii Photo Diary: Exploring Paradise With A Camera

Hawaii is a place you hear a lot about. Growing up watching a lot of American TV meant Hawaii was always portrayed as the holiday destination. My understanding did not stretch much further than Waikiki Beach, North Shore, and Pearl Harbour. When I thought of Hawaii I mainly thought of resorts, surfing, and 1960s holiday chic. That view was completely challenged when I actually landed in the ‘Aloha State’. Not only is Hawaii full of beautiful beaches and peaceful spirits, but there is a rich tapestry of culture and history which is intriguing and important to appreciate.

 

Hawaii became the 50th state in the United States in 1959 but the history of the islands spans millennia before that. It is documented that Polynesians arrived in Hawaii around 1500 years ago on a monumental journey of migration using only the stars as a guide. Centuries later, Tahitians migrated to Hawaii and brought their belief system and social structure.

 

Captain James Cook arrived on Kauai in 1778 and opened the archipelago up to the West. But he was killed a year later on Hawaii Island. With many warring factions the Hawaiian Islands were all officially under one royal kingdom in 1810. 1820 saw the coming of missionaries to Hawaii. From here Hawaii began to be used as a port for traders and the whaling industry escalated. The native Hawaiian population struggled with disease and control. The Hawaiian Kingdom was overthrown by American Colonists in 1893 and became a territory in 1898. The 20th century was also tumultuous as sugar and pineapple plantations brought in a host of immigrants. Hawaii also played a key role in World War II, and the attack on Pearl Habour was a significant event.

 

All of these historical and cultural developments can be felt and appreciated when visiting this island state. Influences from all over the world have defined the Hawaii of modern-day, and this can be seen and felt. Interspersed with the luscious green rain forests, volcanoes, pumping surf beaches, and fresh food, are chances to learn about a unique culture.

 

Over the fantastic three weeks I enjoyed seeing parts of Oahu, Maui, and Big Island — and I am eager to get back and see more! The adventure was a whirlwind of road trips, snorkeling, helicoptering over active volcanoes, and having way too much fun. Hopefully in this Hawaii Photo Diary I can show you a bit about what Hawaii has to offer and share the spirit that it encapsulates. And show that it was so much more than what is fed to us on TV.

 

Also I cannot believe it’s taken me a year to make this post… so here goes!

 

The flight over 


Hawaii Photo Diary

 

The family jumped on our Jetstar flight to Honolulu just as the sun was setting over the East Coast of Australia. The flight was around 9 hours and seemed to go a lot quicker than expected. Soon enough we were in the sweltering Honolulu Airport and had to transfer over to our Island Air terminal. The terminal was quaint and we felt like we were in an island paradise immediately. Our baggage was weighed on bathroom scales and loaded onto the back of the propeller plane. We waited at the gate for an hour or so with our jetlagged ears delighted by the sounds of ukelele music and free tea and coffee. Not bad.

 

Soon enough we had taken off. The little plane headed out of Honolulu and provided breathtaking views over Diamond Head. We were en route to Maui and the journey was almost as pretty as what awaited us on the island.

 

Maui


Maui is a luscious island on one side, and sheer volcanic beauty on the other. From what we’d seen from the sky — we were ready to explore it! And jump right in, we did. The highlight of our time on the island of Maui was the Road To Hana which is a winding coastal route with stunning views. Sipping Mai Tais, attending a Hawaiian luau, and watching the rich pink sunsets were all cherries on top.

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

It was easy to feel as though you were in a tropical dream

Hawaii Photo Diary

The jet-lagged family taking a quick snap before driving onwards to Kaanapali

 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The dramatic tropical landscapes were immediately evident 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Clouds and mountain ridges play at sunset

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Less than 10 minutes into the Road To Hana trip and we were at the Pineapple Express

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The things that look like stones closest to the end of the beach are actually giant turtles! 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Our car for the week in Maui was a bright red Jeep which had a removeable top — it seemed cool until maps, hats and hair went flying everywhere

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

There are plenty of waterfalls and swimming holes to explore along the Road To Hana

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

If you fancy a coconut along the way then you are well-supplied

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Another popular water hole and waterfall along the route

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The Road To Hana hugs the Maui coastline as it covers 103km in 603 bends!

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Stunning greenery is everywhere the eye can see!

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Dad enjoying a swim at another waterfall. By this stage the crowds had substantially thinned out and the watering holes were becoming more private.

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 


READ MORE: Road To Hana: The Best Hawaiian Road Trip


 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Beautiful black lava beach along the Road To Hana

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Haleakala Volcanic Crater is another amazing place to check out in Maui 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The dormant volcano makes for some incredible scenery and there are plenty of opportunities for hiking


READ MORE: Exploring Haleakala Crater: Hiking In A Dormant Volcano 


 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Stunning Maui sunsets at Kaanapali Beach

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Attending a Hawaiian luau was an amazing experience — although the mai tais were virgin as I wasn’t 21 yet (sadface)

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Watching the pig be uncovered for the luau

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Our final night in Maui and the sky put on a pretty spectacular show

 

Big Island


After an incredible week in Maui it was time to head to Big Island. Another lightweight Island Air Flight in crazily windy conditions eventually saw us land. Big Island is well-known for its volcanic activity with much of the island being covered in blackened lava. It was on Big Island that we were able to take a helicopter ride and see the sheer power of a volcano from above. We split our time between Hilo and Kona, both beautiful towns with their own unique spirit.

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The beautiful Akaka Falls

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Steam emerging from beneath the ground at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

We hung around until sunset to see the glow of the volcanic cap

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

I had never really thought about how pineapples grew until I saw this outside my bedroom one morning

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

American-style schoolbuses operate in Hawaii and add to the beautiful colours of towns like Hilo

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

More colourful buildings in Hilo, Big Island

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The Hilo Farmers Market provided some amazing fresh fruit and vegetables

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

It was almost time for takeoff with Blue Hawaiian Helicopters!

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Seeing a lava stream from above was truly a majestic sight! 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Flying over the cone and seeing the sulfur emerge 

 


READ MORE: Hawaiian Helicopter Adventure: My James Bond Moment


 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

These signs may seem surreal but they are important — there were many times when just swimming off the beach we would encounter turtles 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

The vintage Hilo Farmers Market was  the perfect place for a snack

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Strolling through Hilo looking through antique shops and drinking giant American coffees

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Lava is absolutely everywhere 

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Hawaii’s volcanoes well and truly determine the landscape

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Finally finding good coffee

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

In between all the driving there was plenty of time to enjoy the warm beaches and snorkeling

 

Oahu


We unfortunately did not have much time to explore Oahu as we had to get a flight back to Australia. In Honolulu we enjoyed attempting (unsuccessfully) to surf, walking along Waikiki Beach, visiting Pearl Harbour, and relaxing at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. It was a chilled out way to end the adventure.

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Waikiki Beach at dusk

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

Wonderful sunsets at Waikiki Beach

 

Hawaii Photo Diary

When your room comes with the best-ever view

 


Been to Hawaii or have questions — comment below! I would love to hear from you 


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Bagan Photo Diary

Bagan Photo Diary

If you’ve heard of Myanmar, you would’ve heard of Bagan. The magical town overflowing with thousands of temples is an iconic part of the region and a must-visit for travellers. We’ve all heard the expression “a picture is worth a thousand words” and this has never been truer than with Bagan. The spiritual atmosphere is hard to put into writing.

 

Back in 2016 I spent almost a week in Bagan after hearing such wonderful things about it on the “Banana-Pancake Trail” of South East Asia. Safe to say, it lived up to expectations.

 

With a camera slung over my shoulder and a straw hat atop my head, I set out to explore the dusty complex. It became immediately apparent that some form of transportation was required. After bartering with some local boys I got a deal on an old bicycle for the few days; only after I set off did I realise the brakes didn’t work. Problematic, yes, but I made do with it.

 

With a dodgy bicycle, camera, and thirst for capturing the essence of this city there was nothing that was going to stop me. Even not being a morning person. Because if you want to see the best of Bagan you have to get used to early starts, pre-dawn stupa climbing, and in-the-dark bicycling (brakes optional but recommended).

 

So here is my Bagan Photo Diary. Hopefully captures some of the remarkable beauty and spirituality.

 


READ MORE: Guide To Exploring Bagan, Myanmar


Bagan Photo Diary

Watching the hot air balloons rising over the 2200 temples of Bagan, Myanmar

Bagan Photo Diary

Hiring a bicycle means you can cycle around whichever temples take your fancy

Bagan Photo Diary

Sunrises in Bagan seem particularly special

Bagan Photo Diary

Feeling like a legitimate explorer

Bagan Photo Diary

Everywhere you look there are hundreds of temples within eyesight 

 


READ MORE: Ultimate Two Week Myanmar Itinerary


Bagan Photo DiaryExploring this area is remarkably chill and it is encouraged to climb on the stupas to take in the best views

Bagan Photo Diary

Cycling is the recommended method of exploring Bagan

Bagan Photo DiaryChose the perfect temple for balloon takeoff! They take off from different spots each day so sometimes the temple you choose to watch from will be perfect, and other times not so much

Bagan Photo Diary

Forever in awe of the hot air balloons and never able to afford to actually go on one

Bagan Photo Diary

The spectacular golden sunsets seemed to last for hours

Bagan Photo Diary

Full of smiles as I barefoot explore a lesser-known temple close to Bulethi

Bagan Photo Diary

Balloons beginning to take off 

 


READ MORE: Money In Myanmar: What’s The Deal?


Bagan Photo Diary

Daily life continues around the temples of Bagan as the sun sets


 

If you’ve visited Bagan or have questions, comment below because I would love to hear from you!

 


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